HOSPITAL HOUSEHOLDING WORKERS PAYING $80K IN OVERTIME FOR WORKERS WHO ARE CARING FOR PATIENTS article Homecare workers who care for patients at hospitals may be getting a raise, according to the Department of Labor.

The Department of Occupational Safety and Health (OSHA) said Tuesday it has begun a program to raise the overtime threshold for the most common types of work.

OSHA said the overtime pay is now required for the following occupations: Nurses, home health aides, and housekeeping assistants.

The new threshold, which will apply to most occupations, is $80 per hour.

The program will cost an average of $40 to $50 per hour per worker, but it could increase as high as $200 per hour, depending on the number of workers in a company.

OSHS said it expects to spend $2 million in overtime pay in the next two years to implement the change.

This will increase the overtime wage to $80 for nurses, home care aides, housekeeping aides, home healthcare workers and housekeepers.

“The current overtime wage threshold is too low,” OSHS Commissioner Mary Jo White said in a statement.

OSHS has said it has no plans to increase the threshold for its other occupational safety and health protection programs, including those for health care workers, but OSHA has recommended it as an additional safety measure. “

By lowering the overtime compensation threshold, OSHS will ensure that home care workers have the highest possible level of pay.”

OSHS has said it has no plans to increase the threshold for its other occupational safety and health protection programs, including those for health care workers, but OSHA has recommended it as an additional safety measure.

The agency said the new threshold will increase wages for home care and home health care employees by $300 per hour over two years.

The increase in overtime will begin in 2019 and increase over time to $180 per hour by 2020, the agency said.

The average overtime pay rate in the US is $28.72 per hour and was $26.63 per hour in 2018, according the Labor Department.

The overtime threshold is $200 and can increase for many occupations.

This is part of a larger effort by OSHA to increase overtime compensation for workers and their families, OSHA Administrator Lorna Fennelly said in an email.

“We’ve been working with employers, hospitals and other health care facilities to increase their overtime compensation and help workers get the maximum benefit from their time, especially for home health workers.”

OSHA’s wage increase comes on the heels of a wave of unionizing among home health and hospice workers across the country.

The unionizing of nursing home and hospices has been underway for a decade, with a wave in recent years of low-wage, low-skilled workers becoming part of the unionization effort.

Many home care employees have come to expect overtime, Fenneny said.

“Our members have the right to negotiate a fair and reasonable wage with employers to ensure that their families get the care they need and deserve,” she said.

Homecare employees, in contrast, are paid less than a nurse or an aide, and workers who perform housekeeping tasks are often paid less.

The OSHA rule is part-funded by the federal government, and the department has a rule that mandates a minimum salary for each job for homecare workers.

The federal government also pays for overtime compensation of the roughly 5 million workers who work at home care facilities.

The current OSHA overtime pay threshold is not higher than the minimum wage for full-time workers.

Home care workers in the country’s most populous state, California, have had a wage hike since 2018.